Lesson 349 – Mechanics – Punctuation – Commas

Use commas to separate a series of three or more phrases. Example: He ran down the hall, out the door, and into the yard. (The comma before the conjunction and is optional, but I prefer using it.)
Use no commas in a series when all items are joined by or, and, or nor.
Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.
1. The rain splashed against the house onto the sidewalk and into the street.
2. Through the trees around the cabin and down the valley roared the wind.
3. College is to gain knowledge to make new friends and to prepare for a career.
4. The cat climbed up the tree and out on a limb and finally onto the roof.
5. Munching on an apple listening to a recording and sitting on the couch Martha looked very happy.
–For answers scroll down.

Answers:
1. against the house, onto the sidewalk, and into the street.
2. Through the trees, around the cabin, and down the valley,
3. to gain knowledge, to make new friends, and to prepare for a career.
4. no commas needed
5. Munching on an apple, listening to a recording, and sitting on the couch,

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Quiz for Lessons 341 – 345 – Mechanics – Punctuation – Commas

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.
1. Most graciously
2. Dear Madam
3. Do you live at 431 North 500 West West Valley Utah 84098?
4. My birthday party is March 1 1976 at the golf course.
5. Monday February 2 is the day the groundhog looks for its shadow.
6. I lived at 368 Maple Avenue for a week.
7. May 1 was our wedding day.
8. Max Blaser Sr. is their neighbor in Tampa Florida.
9. Did you see Tom Jones Jr. at 430 East Plum Erda Colorado 35096 while on vacation?
10. During August all the leaves turn colors in Springfield Minnesota.
–For answers scroll down.

Answers:
1. Most graciously,
2. Dear Madam: (a business letter)
3. 431 North 500 West, West Valley, Utah 84098?
4. March 1, 1976, at
5. Monday, February 2,
6. (no comma needed – only one part)
7. (no comma needed – only one part)
8. Max Blaser, Sr., / Tampa, Florida.
9. Tom Jones, Jr., / 430 East Plum, Erda, Colorado 35096, while

10. Springfield, Minnesota

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Lesson 345 – Mechanics – Punctuation – Commas

Use a comma after the complimentary close of a friendly or business letter. Example: Sincerely yours,
Instructions: Place commas where they are needed in these complimentary closings.
1. Very truly yours
2. Affectionately yours
3. Yours lovingly
4. Your best customer
5. Cordially
–For answers scroll down.

Answers:
1. Very truly yours,
2. Affectionately yours,
3. Yours lovingly,
4. Your best customer,
5. Cordially,

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from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog
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Lesson 344 – Mechanics – Punctuation – Commas

Use a comma after the salutation of a friendly letter. Example: Dear Fred,
Instructions: Place commas where they are needed in these salutations.
1. Dear Aunt Vi
2. Dear Sir
3. Dear Mother
4. Gentlemen
5. My choicest friend
–For answers scroll down.

Answers:
1. Dear Aunt Vi,
2. Dear Sir: (a business letter)
3. Dear Mother,
4. Gentlemen: (a business letter)
5. My choicest friend,

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from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog
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Lesson 337 – Mechanics – Punctuation – Periods

Use a period after the abbreviations Mr., Mrs., Ms., Dr., and St. (Saint) before a name and Jr., Sr., and Esq., after a name. Do not use a period with Miss because it is not an abbreviation.
Instructions: Put periods where needed in the following sentences.
1. Mr Samuel H White spoke at the celebration last night.
2. Mr and Mrs J B Smythe and their son J B Smythe, Jr , will be at the opening ceremonies.
3. Have you been to St Petersburg and St Louis?
4. Dr Leonard J Arrington was a great historian
5. Ms P T Roberts and Mr John J Jones, Esq will speak at tomorrow’s meeting.
–For answers scroll down.

Answers:
1. Mr. / H.
2. Mr. / Mrs. J. B. / J. B. Jr.
3. St. / St.
4. Dr. / J. / The end of the sentence needs a period.
5. Ms. P. T. / Mr. / J. / Esq.

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Lesson 336 – Mechanics – Punctuation – Periods

Use a period after initials used in names. Examples: E. F. Smith, Helen R. Hunsaker, W. James Swift
Instructions: Put periods where needed in the following sentences.
1. B D Hibler and Gene W Riding started a new company
2. I know K Malone and J Stockton play for the Utah Jazz.
3. Clara B Walters and Ann J Frampton are sisters.
4. C S Lewis is an interesting author to read.
5. I think names with more than two initials like J R R Tolkien are interesting names.
–For answers scroll down.

Answers:
1. B. D. / W. / The end of the sentence needs a period.
2. K. / J.
3. B. / J.
4. C. S.
5. J. R. R.

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Lesson 332 – Mechanics – End Punctuation

Use a period to end an imperative sentence. An imperative sentence makes a command or request.
Instructions: Put the needed punctuation in each of these sentences.
1. Do what you are told
2. Put the dishes in the dish washer
3. Please stop doing that annoying thing
4. Push that stalled car off the road
5. Open your books and start reading
–For answers scroll down.

Answers:
1 – 5 – All sentences require a period at the end of the sentence.

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